7 Warning Signs You May Have a Thyroid Problem



The thyroid gland may be small, but any imbalance in its functionality can potentially damage your health. This hormone-producing gland, which resembles a butterfly is located in the front of the neck. When the hormone level dips too low, your body will send several warning signals.
In today’s video, we will describe seven indicators that are calling for your attention.

1. Throat Discomfort

With its location being so close to the skin, you will be able to feel it. People experience high levels of discomfort and inflammation in the neck and throat areas. Constant sore throats and changes in a person’s voice should be viewed as flashing lights that are signaling something’s wrong.

2. Difficulty concentrating

Confusion is often attributable to aging. But if the situation continues to worsen and you begin forgetting normal day-to-day routines and lack the ability to focus, it’s time to visit your physician. Middle-aged women may falsely associate these types of symptoms with menopause or other age-related conditions. Luckily, when patients with hypothyroidism receive proper treatment, they are pleasantly surprised at how quickly their memories return to normal. When in doubt, always remember to consult your doctor and avoid temptations to self-diagnose.

3. Hair loss and dry skin

Many people notice hair loss, especially in spring and winter. If the hair loss is really pronounced or lasts beyond these seasons, it may indicate trouble is brewing in your thyroid gland.

Another visible symptom to watch for is a significant change in your skin and its texture. Dry, itchy skin is the result of a slower metabolism and reduced perspiration. This is a signal that there’s a change in the thyroid’s hormone secretion.

4. Weight changes

A sudden increase or decrease in weight for no apparent reason should be a cause for concern. In fact, it’s one of the most common symptoms of hypothyroidism. As the thyroid continues to function poorly, the entire body – including your senses – will be affected. You will experience noticeable changes in taste; foods no longer taste the same.

5. Constant fatigue

If you begin to notice that your body is requiring more sleep each night, this may be a signal that your thyroid gland is malfunctioning. When you do manage to sleep longer and the fatigue remains, it’s time to make an appointment with your doctor. Something else to watch for is unexplained muscle aches and cramps.

6. Mood changes and stomach pressure

An excess or deficit supply of thyroid hormones can increase irritability, anxiety and agitation. This may spark feelings of constant sadness and depression because it alters the levels of serotonin in the brain. Also, you may experience difficulties with digestion and stomach pressure that doesn’t improve with a balanced diet and physical exercise.

7. Palpitations, high blood pressure and other symptoms

If you begin to notice palpitations in your neck, this is a reason to contact your physician. Another symptom that accompanies the palpitations is high blood pressure. Bad cholesterol levels may also rise.

As you can see, the thyroid has command over many body functions. When things aren’t working right inside this small gland, it can trigger many symptoms from weight gain to something more serious. If these warning signs are ignored, the problem will only worsen. Address your concerns with your doctor as soon as possible.

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Disclaimer: The materials and the information contained on Natural Cures channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider.

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